Economy

U.S. authorities are investigating whether Yahoo Inc.’s two massive data breaches should have been reported sooner to investors, according to people familiar with the matter, in what could prove to be a major test in defining when a company is required to disclose a hack.

President Donald Trump is taking immediate steps to reorder U.S. economic alliances in his first days in office, setting up meetings with leaders from Mexico and Canada on North American affairs and hosting U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May this Friday to lay the groundwork for a trade pact with London

Foxconn Technology Group is considering building a display-panel manufacturing facility in the United States in a joint venture with Apple Inc. that could create up to 50,000 jobs, the company’s chairman said Sunday.

One day after protesters denouncing President Donald Trump flooded city streets around the U.S., Democrats faced the prospect of turning the freewheeling day of protest into sustained popular opposition to the new president’s agenda.

The final reading on economic growth at the end of the Obama presidency is expected to extend a disappointing trend: The U.S. failed to reach 3% annual growth for an unprecedented 11st straight year. Can Donald Trump alter that dismal reality?

The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and Russian officials said Sunday they were making good progress on their pledges to cut back crude-oil production and raise global prices.

Much about President Donald Trump’s policies are yet shrouded in mystery but there is one thing that Wall Street appears to be certain about–nothing will be the same. And as the fog of uncertainty continue the shroud the market, strategists are urging investors to prepare for the unexpected.

At least 11 people were killed and 23 injured when powerful storms swept through a rural section of southern Georgia on Saturday night and Sunday morning, a state official said

U. S. Sens. John McCain and Lindsey Graham said Sunday they would support Rex Tillerson’s nomination to head the State Department, all but clearing a path through the Senate for the former Exxon Mobil Corp. CEO.

A top spokeswoman to President Donald Trump repeated Sunday that he wouldn’t release his tax returns, saying that any pressure to do so was removed with his November election.

‘Meet the Press’ host Chuck Todd pressed Trump’s top adviser on what he said was a ‘provable falsehood.’

Much about President Donald Trump’s policies are yet shrouded in mystery but there is one thing that Wall Street appears to be certain about–nothing will be the same. And as the fog of uncertainty continue the shroud the market, strategists are urging investors to prepare for the unexpected.

RINGLING BROS and Barnum Bailey, America’s largest circus, knew how to make an entrance. For decades, its elephants promenaded through the Midtown Tunnel into Manhattan, then walked trunk-to-tail along 34th Street to Madison Square Garden. New Yorkers of all ages lined the streets, often in the early hours, to see the annual elephant march. In 2015, bowing to pressure from animal-rights groups, Feld Entertainment, the circus’s parent company, did away with its elephant acts, and once the big beasts were taken off the show ticket sales plummeted. So on January 14th, after 146 years of touring, Feld decided to close the circus nicknamed “The

Much about President Donald Trump’s policies are yet shrouded in mystery but there is one thing that Wall Street appears to be certain about–nothing will be the same. And as the fog of uncertainty continue the shroud the market, strategists are urging investors to prepare for the unexpected.

IN RECENT days, a group of 11 distinguished veterans of theCatholic priesthoodin the German city of Cologne, a stronghold of the church, issued an open letter to mark the 50th anniversary of their ordination. Did theyuse the occasion to ponder aloud the mysteries of their creed, or the wisdom gained in decades of service to the faithful? No. They simply issued a heart-felt cry of pain over their own solitude, a condition they would not wish on future cohorts of clerics.Imploring the pope to allow priests to marry, they wrote:What moves us is the experience of loneliness. As elderly peoplewho are unmarried because our office requiredthis from us, we

THE first full day of Donald Trump’s presidency was marked by some vast protest marches in America and some pretty big ones elsewhere in the world. Demonstrating after an election is a strange thing to do: generally the most effective time to protest is when casting a ballot. The Americans who voted for Mr Trump will have seen the thronged streets and concluded that there are a lot of sore losers. But the “Women’s March on Washington”, organised by activists, did not feel like a protest against the result. It was more like an amble for civility.On the National Mall, where the day before people in red baseball caps had thronged to celebrate the

Much about President Donald Trump’s policies are yet shrouded in mystery but there is one thing that Wall Street appears to be certain about–nothing will be the same. And as the fog of uncertainty continue the shroud the market, strategists are urging investors to prepare for the unexpected.

Hundreds of thousands of people gathered in cities including Frankfurt, Barcelona and Melbourne.

Marchers called for women’s rights, demanded an end to bigotry and protested President Donald Trump.

U.S. stocks end higher Friday, starting the Donald Trump presidency in the green, but the major indexes log their second straight weekly decline as uncertainty about the new administration lingers.

Much about President Donald Trump’s policies are yet shrouded in mystery but there is one thing that Wall Street appears to be certain about–nothing will be the same. And as the fog of uncertainty continue the shroud the market, strategists are urging investors to prepare for the unexpected.

DEPENDING on whom one speaks to, it was either an act of war or a map-reading error. When troops from neighbouring Senegal massed on the Gambian border this week—poised to force out Gambia’s dictator, Yahya Jammeh—reports emerged on Thursday night that they had already crossed the frontier. In fact, according to diplomats, they had merely misprogrammed their GPS navigator, and had strayed over the undulating, unmarked border by mistake.The world’s first “invasion by Sat Nav error”? Or just a deliberate “mistake” to put the wind up Mr Jammeh? Nobody really knows. Although West Africa’s regional power bloc, the Economic Community of

Around 40 were injured when a bus carrying Hungarian high-school students crashed and burst into flames.

The latest lawsuit involves a $7 billion contract to operate 4G wireless networks in Mexico. One person involved in the deal is accused of murder.

Top Democratic operatives and donors gathered in Florida to chart their course forward.

Demonstrators will gather near the U.S. Capitol on Saturday for the Women’s March on Washington.

To sustain the rally on Wall Street, Donald Trump must make good on his promises, but nothing he said inspires any confidence, writes Tim Mullaney.

Earnings so far look mixed, but that could all change when Big Tech reports.

The First Lady worked with the former creative director of Carolina Herrera.